American Union Lodge No. 1

American Union Lodge No. 1 History

The institution of Masonry, kindred to many of the societies and rites of times, owes its continued existence to its ability to render needed service and inspiration to mankind.  We shall review, briefly, some of the incidents in the early life of American Union Lodge No.1, out of the experiences of those who were instrumental in effecting this historic Lodge.  The siege of Boston in 1775 and 1776 brought together many New England Masons in the Continental forces from whose ranks the several Army Lodges were formed.  The record of this historic Lodge reveals a preliminary meeting at Roxbury, MA, attended by Brother Joel Clark and 15 others.  A choice of Officers was made and the minutes of the meeting laid before the Grand Master, asking that the Officers nominated might be confirmed and a dispensation be granted for holding a regular Lodge.  The Grand Master was pleased to grant a warrant and appointing Joel Clark, first Master of American Union Lodge.

This venerable instrument which called our Lodge into existence was issued on Feb. 15th, 1776 and authorized the Lodge to meet in Roxbury, or wherever it shall remove on the continent of America, provided it is where no Grand Master is appointed.  This Masonic body destined to experience every vicissitude of fortune in the Revolutionary Army and finally to light the torch of brotherly love and service anew in the great northwest was launched on its career.

These were times that tried men’s souls.  The Army was before Boston, which was held by 10,000 British troops, well equipped and well supplied, while their ships commanded the ocean.  At any moment they might be attacked by the enemy and none could tell what the final outcome was to be.  Amid these conditions American Union Lodge was born.

The Lodge met in several locations from 1776 to 1778 including New York, Connecticut and New Jersey until it found its permanent home on the banks of the Ohio.  Marietta was to be the home of American Union Lodge for generation to come.  In reality it remained a Military Lodge until 1795, receiving and initiating recruits as they passed on their way to conflict.

The first regular session of the Lodge was held at Campus Martius on June 28, 1790, Jonathan Heart was the Master. The home of Major Sergeant was used until 1794.  Following this date the Lodge met at different locations for several years, but still within the compound of Campus Martius until Aug. 1800, but for the remainder of the year and the early part of 1801 the meetings were held at Bowen’s Inn.  After a fire, a new home was necessary and Lincoln’s Inn was secured.  From Dec. 5, 1803 until 1810 the office of Brother Rufus Putnam was used.  The history is somewhat unclear as to where they met after 1810.  The first discussion for a real Masonic Temple for Marietta was in 1867.  On July 22, 1872 the Lodge met in the new hall which was located on the northeast corner of Front and Butler streets.  A joint movement of Masonic Bodies to erect a Masonic Temple in Marietta was brought to the attention of the Lodge on Feb. 4, 1895.

It was proposed that the building was to be used jointly by all the Masonic Bodies of the city.  On Dec. 8, 1902 American Union Lodge joined the Masonic Building Co.

Approximately five years later, on Oct. 7, 1907, the laying of the corner stone was conducted by the Grand Lodge of Ohio.  The first meeting of American Union Lodge No. 1 in the Temple was held on March 12, 1917 it has been meeting there ever since.  As you may now know, American Union Lodge has had a colorful history from before this Country was into being.  Come and join us and be part of this rich history.

AMERICAN UNION LODGE No. 1 F. & A. M.  1776 – 1958

A Condensed History Compiled for presentation on May 10, 1958
at the Grand Lodge Communication held at Marietta, Ohio
in celebration of the 150th Anniversary of the founding of the
Grand Lodge of Ohio

PART I

A LODGE IS BORN 1776 to 1790

The Institution of Masonry, kindred to many of the societies and rites of times, owes its continued existence to its ability to render needed service and inspiration to mankind. We shall review, briefly, some of the incidents in the early life of one branch of this great institution, American Union Lodge, No.1, out of the experiences of those who were instrumental in effecting this historic Lodge.

The siege of Boston in 1775 and 1776 brought together many New England Masons in the Continental forces from whose ranks the several Army lodges were formed. The record of our own Lodge reveals a preliminary meeting at Roxbury, Massachusetts, attended by Brother Joel Clark and fifteen others. A choice of officers was made and the minutes of the meeting laid before the Grand Master, praying that the officers nominated might be confirmed and a dispensation granted for holding a regular lodge. The minute’s state: The Right Worshipful Grand Master, Richard Gridley, Esq., having been waited on according to appointment, was pleased to grant a warrant to Joel Clark, Esq., appointing him first master of American Union Lodge.

THE WARRANT

This venerable instrument which called our Lodge into existence was issued in the name of John Roe, Grand Master, on Feb. 15, 1776, and bore the signature of Richard Gridley, Deputy Grand Master; William Burbeck, Grand Senior Warden; and William Hoskins, Grand Secretary. It was addressed to Master Brother Joel Clark. The Lodge is authorized to meet in Roxbury, or wherever it shall remove on the continent of America, provided it is where no Grand Master is appointed.

* * *

By virtue of the warrant the brethren met on February 16th, and Entered Apprentice Lodge having been opened, proceeded to elect the following subordinate officers: John Parks, Senior Warden; Thos. Chase, Junior Warden; Jonathan Heart, Secretary, and Samuel H. Par sons, Treasurer. “And each accepted and took their seats with the usual ceremonies.” Jacob Dickerson was appointed Tyler during the Lodge’s pleasure and a committee of three named to pre pare a “body of laws for the regulation of this particular Lodge.” Four persons were proposed to be made Masons, three of whom were elected to receive the Entered Apprentice degree.

On February 20, the organization was completed and the first Masonic work was done. The Lodge was opened in due form with the officers in their proper stations and eleven members and three visitors present. The Entered Apprentice degree was conferred and “the committee having made a report and the laws read, they were agreed to and ordered to be entered,” and a Masonic body destined to experience every vicissitude of fortune in the Revolutionary Army and finally to light the torch of brotherly love and service anew in the great Northwest was launched on its career.

These were the times that tried men’s souls. The Army was before Boston, which was held by 10,000 British troops, well equipped and well supplied, while their ships commanded the ocean … “Gen. Washington was obliged to present a bold front but was unable to undertake any active movements or explain the reason for his inaction.” At any moment they might be at tacked by the enemy and none could tell what the final outcome was to be. Amid these conditions the American Union Lodge was born.

MASONIC WORK DURING THE WAR

Massachusetts

February 20 to April 2, 1776 meetings were held in Roxbury. On March 28, Grand Master John Rowe was present.

New York

In April, 1776, the Army, having moved to New York City, a meeting was held on April 23, at Bridgewater Hall. Eleven subsequent meetings were held between that date and August 15. The Battle of Long Island brought to an end the series of convocations. Two of the brethren were killed, and nine others, including the Worshipful Master, Joel Clark, were captured.

Connecticut

February 15, 1779, Secretary Heart issued a call for a meeting at Reading April 7. Joel Clark had died in prison, and Gen. Samuel H. Parsons was chosen as Worshipful Master.

New York

A meeting was held at Nelson’s Point, June 24, 1779 … at which Gen. George Washington was present. It was during this second sojourn in New York that Brother Rufus Putnam, afterwards leader of the pioneer settlement to Marietta, and eventually the first Grand Master of Ohio, was initiated, passed and raised. Brother Moses Cleveland, who was one of the leaders of the Connecticut pioneers to northern Ohio, was made an Entered Apprentice.

New Jersey

During the Army’s occupation of New Jersey in the winter of 1779-80 a few meetings were held in Morristown. The meeting of December 27, celebrating the festival of St. John the Evangelist, was the largest in numbers, thirty-three members and sixty-nine visitors, including General Washington.

SUMMARY – THE LAST YEARS OF THE WAR

No record of meetings in 1781, but meetings were held at different places in New York. The last meeting was held April 23, 1783. From now on the meetings of the Lodge were very irregular and little Masonic work was done.

The war was over and the soldiers returned to their homes to take up the duties of peace. The Lodge had come into existence while the conflict was in its infancy and had continued until its close. Her first Master had died a prisoner. Her second, General Samuel H. Par sons, had rendered distinguished service to his country, attained the rank of Major General and was a member of the military court, which had tried Major Andre. Major Heart, the third Master, enlisted in time to take an honorable part in the battle of Bunker Hill and continued in the army until he met a soldier’s death striving to rally Gen. St. Clair’s troops in the West. The members came from Connecticut, Massachusetts, New York, New Jersey, Delaware and Virginia….

More than once disaster had brought the Lodge to the brink of destruction, but it had survived and, though the brethren knew it not, in the providence of God it was destined to light the fires of Masonry in a land, which they had not seen. An interval of seven years elapsed and when the Lodge again assembled, it was to find a permanent home on the banks of the Ohio.

AT MARIETTA

The little band of pioneers who landed at Marietta on April 7, 1788, and those who came after them, contained members of American Union Lodge and others of the fraternity who were anxious to erect an altar of Masonry in the wilderness. Soon this came to pass and the wandering of the Lodge had ceased. Here it was to remain, a powerful influence for good in the new settlement for generations yet to come. In the words of Brother Martin R. Andrews: “The year 1790 marks the beginning of a new era in the history of American Union Lodge.”

For five years it continued to be in reality a military lodge, receiving and initiating recruits as they passed on their way to conflict. Yet the Lodge had found a permanent home. She stood at the portals of the great Northwest, and at her altar many a pioneer halted long enough to light a torch, which he could bear far away into the wilderness. This then was the Golden Age of our history, not because it was free from trials and cares, for the whole period is full of struggles and perils. Rest is not the ideal of men who meet for the purpose of learning how to labor for the good of others. The period was truly golden in the opportunities it afforded the little group of brothers on the frontier to make their influence felt throughout a vast empire and into successive generations.” …

AMERICAN UNION LODGE No. 1 F. & A. M.  1776 – 1958

A Condensed History Compiled for presentation on May 10, 1958
at the Grand Lodge Communication held at Marietta, Ohio
in celebration of the 150th Anniversary of the founding of the
Grand Lodge of Ohio

PART II

A HOME IN THE WILDERNESS

1790-1808

Jonathan Heart, third and last Worshipful Master of American Union (Army) Lodge, was mustered out of military service in December 1783. Two years later Brother Heart, as a captain in the army, raised for the protection of the western frontier, brought the Warrant of American Union Lodge to the west.

In November 1785, a detachment of troops under Major and Brother John Doughty had been sent to the mouth of the Muskingum River and there erected Fort Harmar. Under the leadership of General Rufus Putnam the Ohio Company of Associates (New England veterans of the Revolution) landed at the mouth of the Muskingum, opposite Fort Harmar, April 7, 1788, and began the settlement of Marietta, the “Plymouth Rock of the West.” Log cabins were built and a stockade, called Campus Martius, was erected as a refuge against the Indians. Such was the beginning of the first permanent settlement planted within the limits of the Northwest Territory.

On June 25, 1790, ten Brethren including Bro. Rufus Putnam, all residents of the nearby settlement of Marietta, forwarded a petition to Worshipful Bro. Heart, who was stationed at Fort Harmar, requesting him to form them into a lodge. In answer to their petition Bro. Heart replied in part: “The Warrant (of American Union Lodge) was granted by Richard Gridley, Deputy Grand Master, whose authority extended to all points of North America, where no special Grand Lodge was appointed…. It will, therefore, follow that there being no special Grand Master of this Territory, a more ample authority for holding a Lodge in this country could not be obtained”.

Campus Martius 1791

Campus Martius 1791

The first regular session of lodge was held at Campus Martius on June 28, 1790. Its officers were: Jonathan Heart, W.M.; Benjamin Tupper, S.W.; Rufus Putnam, J.W.; Robert Oliver, Treasurer; and Anselm Tupper, Secretary. It was the first meeting of a Masonic lodge held on Ohio soil and with one exception, the first ever held in the Northwest Territory.

When the By Laws of the Lodge were signed later in the year, eighty-six members attached their signatures. Still being some doubt, however, in the mind of Bro. Heart as to the regularity and recognition of the newly organized Lodge, letters were sent to the Grand Lodge of Massachusetts and Grand Lodge of Pennsylvania.

On December 6, 1791, the Grand Master of the Grand Lodge of Massachusetts replied in part: “Your Warrant is beyond doubt a perfect and a good one … until a Grand Lodge is founded and established in your territory…. I confirm your Warrant as good and perfect, as you are where no Grand Lodge is established.”

On May 21, 1792, a letter was received from the Grand Secretary of the Grand Lodge of Pennsylvania which read in part: “It was with equal surprise and pleasure the Grand Lodge of Pennsylvania received intelligence of the formation of a lodge in the midst of the immense wilderness of the West…. As the account which you have given of the origin of your warrant is perfectly satisfactory and as the succession to the Chair has been uninterrupted, your authority for renewing your work appears to be incontestable.” Thus were the Brethren assured of the right to carry on the work of the Craft in their new land.

Bro. Heart in the latter part of 1791 accompanied the ill-fated expedition of General and Bro. Arthur St. Clair against the Miami Indians. On November 4, 1790, a desperate battle was fought in what is now Mercer County in Western Ohio, with fatal consequences to the whites. Over nine hundred men and officers, including Bro. Heart, lost their lives in St. Clair’s defeat. Following the death of Bro. Heart, American Union Lodge on December 5, 1791, “resolved that the Brethren wear a Masonic badge of mourning two months as a mark of respect to the character of a person so much esteemed, both as a man and a Mason, and the one who first illuminated this part of the Western Hemisphere with the light of Masonry”.

Some years later another unfortunate circumstance occurred. On March 24, 1801, fire destroyed the lodge hall and with it were lost its Warrant, furniture, jewels and implements. On November 7, 1803, Wr. Bro. Putnam reported that he had received a Charter from the Grand Lodge of Massachusetts, “renewing the rights, privileges and precedence of this Lodge as heretofore established”.

Ohio became a state in 1803, and Chillicothe continued to be the capital of Ohio until 1810. Prior to the year 1810, Masonic Lodges had been established at Marietta, Cincinnati, Warren, Worthington, Zanesville and Chillicothe. These Lodges were widely separated and travel between the settlements was chiefly on horseback. It was probably at the legislative sessions at Chillicothe that discussion relative to the formation of a Grand Lodge of Ohio first took place.

Following the discussions, the initiative was taken by Erie Lodge No. 47 of Warren. At a meeting held March 11, 1807, a committee was appointed to correspond with the other lodges then in the State. On July 6, 1807, Bro. Rufus Putnam laid before American Union Lodge a letter received from Erie Lodge requesting the assistance of American Union Lodge in forming a Grand Lodge of Ohio. Similar letters were received by the other lodges then in the State and, as a result of this correspondence, representatives met at Chillicothe on January 4, 1808, in a Grand Convention. Brothers Ichabod Nye and William Skinner were chosen by ballot and represented the Lodge at the Chillicothe conference.

On January 7, 1808, the Brethren then in session took steps which led to the organization of the Grand Lodge of Ohio, F. & A. M., on which occasion a series of resolutions signifying conditions associated with membership were adopted. Bro. Rufus Putnam of American Union Lodge was chosen Grand Master and the first Grand Communications was to be held on the first Monday of the year 1809, “at whatsoever place the Legislature of Ohio shall then be in session”.

The early Masonic home of American Union Lodge is an historic matter of special interest. From the date of establishment of the Lodge until 1794, the home of Major Sergeant at Campus Martius was used. Following this date, for several years the Lodge met at different places and in many records of the Secretary the place of meeting is not given. From January until August 1800, the Lodge had met at Camp us Martius, but for the remainder of the year and the early part of 1801, the meetings were held at Bowen’s Inn. After the fire of March 24th, a new home was necessary and Lincoln’s Inn was secured as a temporary movement where meetings were occasionally held. From December 5, 1803 until 1810 the office of Bro. Putnam was used as the meeting place.

The raising of Brother Lewis Cass to the Sublime Degree of Master Mason on May 7, 1804, is one of the notable events in the early history of this Lodge, because he became one of the most distinguished Masons, thereafter, in the United States. His many accomplishments included: admission to the bar in 1802, elected to the Ohio Legislature in 1806, served in War of 1812, appointed Governor of Michigan Terri tory in 1813, became Secretary of War under President Jackson in 1831, appointed Minister to France in 1836, United States Senator 1845 to 1848, and Secretary of State 1857 to 1860. During these busy years he found time to serve the Grand Lodge of Ohio as Grand Master from 1810 to 1813. In 1826 he was elected Grand Master of the Grand Lodge of Michigan and also in 1827-28.

For many years all the regular business of the Lodge was conducted in the Entered Apprentice Degree, as was then usual, and a custom in vogue when under the rules of the United Grand Lodge of England. Regardless of the degree in which they labored, the roots of Masonry were firmly established in a new land and helped immeasurably in building “A Home in the Wilderness.”

AMERICAN UNION LODGE No. 1 F. & A. M.  1776 – 1958

A Condensed History Compiled for presentation on May 10, 1958
at the Grand Lodge Communication held at Marietta, Ohio
in celebration of the 150th Anniversary of the founding of the
Grand Lodge of Ohio

PART III

MASONRY MARCHES ON 1809 to PRESENT

The city of Chillicothe was the site of the first Grand Communication of the Grand Lodge of Free and Accepted Masons of Ohio on January 2, 1809. A regrettable situation existed at this time preventing American Union Lodge No.1 from attending this most significant gathering. The city of Marietta is located in the southern end of the Muskingum Valley at the confluence of the Muskingum and Ohio Rivers, which bodies of water periodically overflow their picturesque banks and inundate the surrounding countryside, therefore placing large portions of Marietta under water.

In December of the preceding year, our first Grand Master, Rufus Putnam, who was also the founder of Marietta, found it necessary to resign from the office of Grand Master because of advanced years and ill health. Brother Putnam served honorably as Master of American Union Lodge in 1794, 1798, and 1800. His death occurred in 1824, being 86 years of age, at which time he was, with the exception of Brother (General) Lafayette, the last surviving general officer of the Revolutionary Army.

At the 1810 session of Grand Lodge it was “Resolved, that the several Charters surrendered to this Grand Lodge by the Lodges under its jurisdiction be endorsed by the Grand Secretary, ‘surrendered and canceled in due form, by order of the Grand Lodge,’ and then returned to the respective Lodges to remain in the archives thereof for safe keeping; subject, however, to the order of the Grand Lodge at all times.”

Up until this time American Union Lodge No. 1 had maintained itself in an independent position as concerns proper and subordinate relationships with the Grand Lodge of Ohio. Regardless of this fact, Grand Lodge saw fit to reserve the number one position on its roster for American Union Lodge because of its age and military service during the Revolutionary War. A letter of invitation to identify itself with the Grand Lodge of Ohio was received from that body by American Union Lodge and read in open lodge in 1814. The following action was considered necessary: “On motion, it is Resolved, that it is pre-expedient to resign the present Warrant to the Grand Lodge of Ohio; or to any other Lodge; because that in so doing it will annihilate the Royal Arch Chapter working under said Warrant. Therefore this Lodge rejects any jurisdiction of the Grand Lodge of Ohio over this Lodge.”

This controversy between the Grand Lodge of Ohio and American Union Lodge continued for several years. The situation was finally brought to a head in 1823 when several worthy brethren who had previously broken away from the old Lodge petitioned the Grand Lodge of Ohio for the right to revive and organize the defunct American Union Lodge No. 1 under jurisdiction of the Grand Lodge of Ohio. The Grand Lodge, after due investigation, granted the Charter, thus ending the long and unfortunate controversy between American Union Lodge and the Grand Body.

THE DARK YEARS

In Batavia, New York in the year 1826, a man by the name of William Morgan was allegedly preparing an expose of Freemasonry. This reported act created quite a disturbance among Masonic Brethren, and resulted in efforts to prevent such an action. However, in 1826, a partner by the name of Miller published, “Morgan’s Freemasonry Exposed and Explained.”

Morgan disappeared and the publication of the expose’ created quite a sensation in America, and resulted in the development of what became known as the Anti-Masonic Movement. Many lodges folded or operated secretly and American Union was one among the many. Even those lodges, which managed to work during this period from 1830 to 1843, were drastically reduced in membership.

Application was made by American Union Lodge in 1843 to resume labor. The Grand Lodge accepted the application, and American Union once again resumed her labors of the Craft.

THE MASONIC HALL

The first discussion concerning a real Ma sonic Temple for Marietta was in 1867. During the next five years various plans were proposed, investigated and abandoned for one reason or another. Further consideration was introduced on January 2, 1871, at which time a committee was appointed to see if a suitable lodge room could be found. Proposals, investigations and discussions were to no avail. On March 1, 1872, George H. Eells proposed to the Lodge that concerning a building he was erecting, “he would build his walls two stories high, and put in joists, the Lodge then to take the building at that point and build the third story to suit themselves. ‘I will build the stairs, and give free use of them. You pay me $400, and you own the third story. I will give you perpetual use of the stairs.’ ” This offer seemed so attractive it was accepted by the Lodge.

The Masonic Hall

The Masonic Hall

On Monday, July 22, 1872, the Lodge met in the new hall, which was located on the north east corner of Front and Butler Streets (the present location of the Rosenberger Company). This was the last home of American Union Lodge before the one in the present Masonic Temple Building.

THE WASHINGTON APRON

This apron, once worn by Brother (General) George Washington, is on display in the museum built on the site of the fort, Campus Martius. There are several other Masonic relics displayed with this apron.

The history of this apron is covered in the following excerpts from a letter, dated 1893, from one Ludwell M. Cunard to George T. Hovey, Master of American Union Lodge for fourteen almost consecutive years … “According to my promise I send you the Masonic apron which was the subject of our conversation at Grand Chapter. Much of its history is tradition, but I assure you that Virginians are as scrupulous regarding tradition, as were the Jews. The apron was originally the property of Henry Lee of Virginia. The tradition is that he owned it prior to the Revolution. My Great Grandfather was employed by the Lee family, and was promised that he might someday have the apron, for as George Washington had once worn it, it would be quite a keepsake. But before he could come into possession of it, his employer died, and the apron fell into the hands of a Mr. Hayden, his grandson, who inscribed his own name upon it. My father, Judge Stephen T. Cunard, was made a Mason in Virginia in 1825, and removed to this state (Ohio) in 1834, but was so determined to have this apron, that should rightfully be in the Cunard family, that he, by strategy, procured it just before he left. I prize it quite highly and trust that you will receive it in the spirit in which it is given, that of Fraternity.”

A Joint Movement of Masonic Bodies to Erect a Masonic Temple in Marietta, was brought to the attention of the Lodge on February 4, 1895. It was proposed that the building, if erected, was to be used jointly by all the Masonic Bodies of the City.

On December 8, 1902, American Union Lodge joined the Masonic Building Company by subscribing to 100 shares in said company. Approximately five years later, on October 7, 1907, the laying of the cornerstone of the new Masonic Temple in Marietta was conducted by the Grand Lodge of Ohio on the Front Street site facing Muskingum Park.

A NEW HALL FOR THE LODGE

In 1916 the two lower floors of the building on which American Union Lodge had built their Lodge room in 1872 were sold. It was proposed that it might be wise for the Lodge to offer the third floor to the new buyer. Among the many proposals concerning the sale and the removal to new quarters, the plan of moving to the Masonic Temple was suggested. Upon investigation, it was found that by paying a monthly rental of $40.00 in addition to its 100 shares of stock in the Company, its proportion of the cost of the stereopticon lantern, and equipment of the kitchen and the banquet hall, American Union could enjoy and make use of the full facilities available at the Temple. Final decisions were made for the sale of the lodge room and the removal to the Masonic Temple. The first meeting of American Union Lodge No. 1 in the Temple was held on March 12, 1917.

PRESENT MASONIC TEMPLE

Present Masonic Temple

Present Masonic Temple

DISTINGUISHED VISITORS TO AMERICAN UNION LODGE

American Union Lodge No.1 F. & A. M. takes great pride in claiming the membership of three Governors of Ohio and three Grand Masters of the Grand Lodge of Ohio, Free and Accepted Masons.

 BRO. CHARLES WARREN FAIRBANKS

Oriental Lodge No. 500, Indiana; Vice President of the United States 1905-59;

Bro. Fairbanks was in Marietta on October 19, 1906, for the purpose of dedicating some new buildings at Marietta College and unveiling the bronze tablet erected at the College to the memory of the men who first settled in the Northwest Territory, and who laid the foundations for the five great States of the Northwest.

 BRO. WILLIAM H. TAFT

Kilwinning Lodge No. 356, Cincinnati; President of the United States 1909-13;

Bro. Taft was in Marietta on June 15, 1910, to be in attendance at the Diamond Jubilee of Marietta College.

BRO. JUDSON HARMON

Walnut Hill Lodge No. 483, Cincinnati; Governor of State of Ohio 1908-13;

Bro. Harmon was in Marietta on June 14, 1910, to be in attendance at the Diamond Jubilee of Marietta College.

BRO. RETURN JONATHAN MEIGS, JR.

Brother Meigs was initiated December 6, 1790; passed to the degree of Fellowcraft December 24, 1790; and raised to the sublime degree of Master Mason January 11, 1791; died March 29, 1824. Governor of Ohio from 1810- 14 and also served as U. S. Senator from Ohio 1808-10 and Postmaster General from 1814-23.

 BRO. GEORGE WHITE

Brother White was initiated February 21, 1910; passed to the degree of Fellowcraft, March 7, 1910; and raised to the sublime degree of Master Mason, May 10, 1915, and passed to his reward on December 15, 1953. He served as Governor of Ohio from 1931-34.

 BRO. C. WILLIAM O’NEILL

Brother O’Neill was initiated May 22, 1939; passed to the degree of Fellowcraft June 20, 1939; and raised to the sublime degree of Master Mason, July 18, 1939. He served as Governor of Ohio from January 17, 1957-60.

 W. BRO. RUFUS PUTNAM

Brother Putnam was elected the first Grand Master of the Grand Lodge of Ohio in 1808. He never occupied the office due to health conditions.

M.W. BRO. LEWIS CASS

Brother Cass was initiated December 5, 1803; passed to the degree of Fellowcraft, April 2, 1804; and raised to the sublime degree of Master Mason, May 7, 1804 and died June 17, 1866. He served as Grand Master from 1810-13.

M.W. BRO. HARRY E. SCHRAMM

Brother Schramm was initiated October 13, 1919; passed to degree of Fellowcraft, November 17, 1919; and raised to the sublime degree of Master Mason, December 15, 1919, and passed on to the Great Lodge above, September 18, 1956. He served as Grand Master in 1943.

REFERENCES

PART I-From an address delivered by Past Master Ralph E. Toler, February 19, 1915, at the celebration of the 139th anniversary of the founding of the Lodge.

PART II AND III-From Plumb’s History of American Lodge No.1, and papers prepared by Wor. Bro. James J. Tyler, Historian of the Grand Lodge of Ohio and Bro. James R. Case of Bethel, Conn., presented at a special communication of the Grand Lodge F. & A. M. of Ohio, held at Marietta, July 28, 1951, commemorating the 175th anniversary of the founding of the Lodge.